A birthday card

Hi!

My mother’s 60th birthday is just around the corner, and I decided to make her a somewhat fancy birthday card. For this card, I used several of Sue Wilson’s die cuts (from Creative Expressions). If you want to see the (almost) full list of supplies used in this card, scroll further down.

Also, some future posts in this blog will include: Halloween (card) crafts, Christmas cards, and the long-awaited pattern for my Remix/ruffle booties. I’ve also tried to make a new and improved/different pattern for the strip-method crochet rose, so stay tuned and hopefully I’ll have something to show you soon.

Here are some (sadly bad) photos of my mom’s birthday card. As the days are getting darker, I find it difficult to find a good light source for indoor photos. Please leave a comment, if you know of any good extra-light photography equipment, LED-lights for example. Thanks!

Birthday card Birthday card

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Thanks for viewing! And have a wonderful weekend.

-Kati-

PS. Happy birthday, mom!!!

PPS. Thank you for all the comments I’ve received lately via the feedback form!


SUPPLIES FOR THE BIRTHDAY CARD:

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Kusudama

Introducing another flowery project, but, for a change, the next project is from the time-consuming and paper-cut-ridden field of origami!

I was browsing through Craftster.org, in the look-out for inspiration, when I came across this Japanese origami flower called Kusudama. If you’re interested in knowing how the paper flower ball is made, follow the links in the Craftster.org post (the instructions/tutorial is originally by Foldingtrees.com).

My Kusudama ball is made from pages from a phonebook (recycling!), and due to the lack of glue, I was forced to use dry adhesive (double-sided tape), which caused me some assembly problems, but all in all, it turned out pretty great. A single flower is made from 5 slips of paper (7cm x 7cm OR 3″ x 3″), and the entire Kusudama ball has 12 flowers in it. And so… 60 paper slips, 12 flowers, and 3-4 hours later… here’s my Kusudama ball! Thanks for viewing!