Where did you come from? How did you find my blog? ☺

Hi!

I’ve been wondering where all of my new viewers and visitors come from, so… how did you find my blog? Did someone share a photo of mine on Pinterest? Or maybe it was a link on Facebook? Or perhaps you searched for something on Google.

Please vote and/or leave a comment! I’d love to know how you found my blog.

Oh, and if someone shared my blog on Facebook, please share that person’s link/page with me, too.

Thank you in advance!

 

 

Send me feedback via this form, if you wish:

Candy Baby Booties

Hello!

If you’ve been wondering where I’ve been, again, I’ve been busy working on several projects. Here are some pictures of the booties I’ve made lately.
The black/mix-colored ones are Candy booties, and I’ll be making a pattern out of them for sale.

Thanks for viewing!
Thank you and welcome to the new subscribers!

-Kati-

The finished Remix-booties. Baby booties

Miniature Crochet Rose

Hi!

Inspired by miniature crochet animals made by SuAmi, I decided to try and make a miniature crochet rose. The task seemed simple enough: just use a very fine, single ply yarn, and a tiny crochet hook. Easy, right?

No. Nope. Not at all.

I thought I had good eyesight, but I have been proven wrong. I even thought I had pretty nimble fingers, but wrong again.

It was almost impossible to see the stitches and even more impossible to get the hook to go through them. But after a few tries, I managed to make one tiny rose, which is still not as tiny as SuAmi’s miniature animals. After a few hours of squinting my eyes and doing crochet-acrobatics, I take my hat off to SuAmi, and will stick to normal-sized roses from now on.

Speaking of which: I bought some awesome new yarns from a lovely shop called Karnaluks in Tallinn, Estonia. I’ve aYarns from Karnalukslready made a few roses using the yarns, and I’ll be posting the results on my blog someday soon.

 

And here’s what I managed to make this time. It’s a little under 2cm in diameter (so less than 0.787402 inches, if that makes sense).

Thanks for viewing! And happy Easter to everyone!

Miniature crochet rose Miniature crochet rose

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Crochet Leprechaun Hat [pencil decoration] – Free Pattern

Hi!

leprechaun

St. Patrick’s day is just around the corner… So here’s a pattern for a crochet leprechaun hat that I created as a pencil decoration. I’ll post a blog entry about a green pop-up heart and a shamrock soon, too!

Apologies in advance if the pattern makes no sense or if there are horrible typos (this was a long project to make/write up). It’s my first time trying to write down instructions for an original pattern, and I wasn’t entirely sure how to explain it all. Leave a comment below, if you wish to have more detailed instructions, or if you want clarifications for some part of the pattern.

Leprechaun hats

Leprechaun hat pencil decoration – pattern:

Abbreviations:

ch(s) = chain(s)
sc = single crochet
st(s) = stitch(es) (At the end of each round “—- st” = the number of stitches made on that round.)
sc2tog  = 2 single crochets together (decrease)
sl st = slip stitch
back lps = back loops only
front lps = front loop only

Notes:

  • I used basic cotton yarns and a size 1.75mm hook. (In other words: use a fine yarn and a small hook.)
  • First, start by making a magic circle/an adjustable ring, or chain 2 loosely and work round 1 into the first chain made.
  • Work in countinuous rounds. Do not join any of the rounds and do not cut the yarn at any point. Use a stitch marker to mark each round, if you wish.

♣ The crown top of of the hat:
Round 1: Into the magic circle, work 6 sc. (Pull the circle closed.)  —- 6sts
Round 2: 2 sc into each st around. —- 12 sts
Round 3: [2 sc in next st, sc in next st] 6 times. —- 18 sts.Hat top
Round 4: [2 sc in next st, sc in the next 2 sts] 6 times. Sl st into the next st. —- 24 sts.
(At this point, it wound be good to fasten off the beginning yarn, but do not cut off the yarn you’re working with.)

NOTE: The top of the hat is supposed to lay flat.

♣ The side band (“body”) of the hat:
(Ch 1, if necessary to get to the next round, to make a sharper edge to the top of the hat.)
Round 5: Working in back lps only: sc into each st around. —- 24 sts.
Round 6: (Decrease round) Working in both loops again: [sc2tog, sc in next 2 sts] 6 times. —- 18 sts.
Round 7-8: Work sc into each st around. —- 18 sts. (Change the colour of the yarn at the end of round 8. Do not cut off the other yarn.)Colour change
Round 9-11: With a different colour (for example: black), sc into each st around. —- 18 sts.
(At the end of round 11., reattach the first yarn you used (green), but do not cut off the second yarn (black). Fasten off the start of the black yarn.)

♣ The brim of the hat:
Round 12: With green again, make an increase round in front loops only: [2 sc in next st, sc into next st] 9 times. —- 27 sts.
Round 13: In both loops again, work: [2 sc into next sc, sc into next 2 sts] 9 times. —- 36 sts.
Round 14: [2 sc into the next sc, sc into the next 5 sts] 6 times. Sl st into the next st (or just fasten off). Cut the yarn. —- 42 sts.

Belt buckle: At this point, decorate the black wrap-around part with, for example, yellow yarn. Make a belt buckle on the opposite side of the start of the rounds. I made a square, weaving around each side of the square twice to make the lines pop out more. Belt buckle

♣ Finally, make the part that wraps around the pen/pencil:
(Or stop  here, and just use the hat as a finger puppet, etc.)
Round 1: With the black yarn (that is still supposed to be attached to the hat), work in the back loops (of black yarn) that were left behind in round 12. There are 18 back loops. Work a decrease round, ending with 12 loops.
Working with the black yarn: Pull up loop through the nearest sc (start of round 11), pull up a loop through the next sc too, working a sc2tog. Sc into next st. Then: [sc2tog, sc in next st] 5 times. —- 12 sts
NOTE: For the next round: Depending on how big you want the hole for the pencil/pen to be, decrease a few more times. I made a hole that fits arPencil holder/wrap-aroundound a normal pencil.
Round 2: [sc2tog, sc in the next 5 sts] twice. —- 10 sts.
Round 3-4: Sc into next st, around. At the end of round 4, sl st into the next st and/or fasten off. —- 10 sts.

You can make more rounds, if you want the wrap around the pencil to be longer.

And that’s it!

Leprechaun  hatLeprechaun hat

♣ ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣ ♣

Thanks for viewing! Again, leave a comment below if you need help with this pattern. And please, if you make a leprechaun hat using this pattern, give credit to KatiCrafts, thanks!


CROCHET ROSE – PATTERN

Abbreviations:

Abbr. Meaning
ch chain, chain stitch
dc US double crochet (UK treble) (dcs = plural)
sc US single crochet (UK double crochet)
sp space
st stitch

Materials:

Yarn: I used Novita’s crochet yarn for this particular rose. The yarn is 100% mercerised cotton. (You can pretty much use any yarn you wish.) I find that a rather thin yarn works best.

Hook: Depending on thickness (weight) of your yarn, use whichever hook suitable. For Novita’s crochet yarn, I used JMRA’s hook size 1,25mm (8).

And a needle to stitch it all up!

Instructions:

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Note 1: You can either leave a long tail of yarn at the start or at the finish of the rose (or both ends), to stitch the strip of petals together. (I leave a tail at the end, after fastening the last row off, so the long yarn tail at the start won’t get in the way.)
Note 2: The example rose includes 39 petals. See alterations below if you wish to make a larger/smaller rose.

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Row 1: Make as many chains as you wish, in order to create a rose the size you wish.
(See below: alterations A.)

For this example rose: make 118ch.  Then, into 4th ch from the hook work 1dc. After that, *1ch, skip 2ch from the chain row, and [1dc, 2ch, 1dc] into the next st*. The first row looks like a row of V-shapes. Repeat *-* to the end of the chain stitches. Turn.

(You should have 39 V-shapes at the end of row 1.)

Row 1 of the crochet rose Row 1 of the crochet rose

Row 2:  First 3ch (counts as the first dc). Then: [1dc, 2ch, 2dc] into first 2-ch sp (in other words, work the next row into the V-shapes). From then on: *[2ch, 2dc, 2ch, 2dc] in next 2-ch sp*. Repeat *-* to the end. Turn.

Row 2 of the crochet rose Row 2 of the crochet rose

Row 3: This is the row that creates the final petals. See alterations B below, for more information.

Start row 3 straight away with double crochet stitches after turning, working the double crochet stitches into the 2-ch spaces, and then attaching each petal to the next 2-ch space with a sc.

At the end of Row 2, you should still have 39 two-chain spaces, meaning you can create 39 petals. I have divided the petals and the amount of double crochet stitches made into them as follows:

  • 10 petals of 10 dc
  • 8 petals of 8 dc
  • 7 petals of 7 dc
  • 9 petals of 6 dc
  • 3 petals of 5 dc
  • 2 petals of 4 dc

So following this division, make [10dc into next 2-ch sp, 1sc into next 2-ch sp] 10 times in total. And then [8dc into next 2-ch sp, 1sc into next 2-ch sp] eight times.. and so on, until you get to the final petal of 4dc. Attach the final dc on top of the 3ch of the previous row with a sc or a slip stitch . Leave a tail long enough to weave in, and fasten off.

Row 3 of the crochet roseRow 3 of the crochet rose

Assembling the rose

Roll up the rose, starting from the smallest petals. Roll the next layers around the base of the smallest petals. Keep the base of the rose flat so that the rose doesn’t turn into a spirally cone (try to look at the base too while you’re rolling it up).

(Of course, if you don’t want the rose to be flat, you can push the middle of the rose up a bit from the base, and then just stitch it up to fasten the new shape.)

Adjust the petals to the positions you want them to be in, and then stitch it all up, making sure that the petals aren’t moving too much.

Rolling up the crochet rose Rolling up the crochet rose Rolling up the crochet rose

Tip: You can roll the rose up so that either side of the strip is facing up (see photos below), if you want. The rose will look different if you make the “wrong” side face up. (See photos below!)

Right side up:

Rolled up crochet rose, right side


Wrong side up:

Rolled up crochet rose, wrong side

Alterations:

A) For the first row: If you wish to add more petals, increase the chain count by 3 chain stitches at the beginning of the first row, for each petal. For example, 38 petals means: 38 x 3 = 114 chains. Plus, add 4 chains for each calculation, as the first row starts with skipping the first 4 chains (this creates one petal). For example, if the total chain count is 118 chains, it will create 39 petals. A formula, if you will, is as follows: [the number of petals you want] x 3ch + 4ch

B) If you wish to change the size of the petals, you need to make more/less double-crochet stitches at the last row (row 3) into the 2-ch spaces. Depending on the thickness of your yarn, you can start with making, for example, 10dc into each petal, and then gradually make less and less dcs into each petal, or even make the same amount of dcs into each space, creating petals that are all the same size. Test out how the petals are divided into each rolled-up layer (for instance, if you make 10 petals that all have 9dc, they will create the base for the rose, then the next rolled-up layer will be smaller, so make fewer petals with less dc in them). My suggestion is that you should make a lot of medium-sized petals in the middle of the strip, with 6 or 7 dcs in them, and about one or two layers of bigger petals for the base, and just a few smaller petals for the center of the rose, where the roll is the tightest. (You can’t really tell how many dcs each petal has in the finished product, so this isn’t an exact science, but the rose rolls up differently depending on how big the petals are and how many petals there are to roll up. It’s all very trial-and-error.)

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And that’s it!

Thank you for viewing!

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All images ©KatiCrafts. Please ask permission before using the images in this blog post. If you pin the images at Pinterest, please give credit to KatiCrafts. Thank you!

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Crochet Rose Leaf

Hi, all!
Crochet Rose Leaf
I recently made a promise to share a pattern for a crochet rose leaf, and so this is me, fulfillig my promise. If you’d like to see me craft something specific, or post instructions for it, please let me know!

For the leaves in my pictures below, I used this pattern:

Veined Leaf Pattern (All credit goes to Wind Rose Fiber Studio.)

First, start by: chain 10, leaving 8” beg tail
Side 1: working in back loops of beginning chain, 3 dc in fourth st from hook, dc in next 3 sts, hdc in next st, sc in next st, sl st in last st, ch 1, sl st in ch just made (leaf point made)
Side 2: working down the other side of the beginning chain in the front loops, sl st in next st, sc in next st, hdc in next st, dc in next 3 sts, work 3 dc in next st, join with sl st to top of beg ch 3

Stem: chain 4, sl st in second st from hook and in next two sts. sl st to next dc, finish off weaving in all loose ends

Note: The tip of the leaf gave me some problems at first, but luckily there’s a helpful YouTube video to show how it’s done: http://youtu.be/j8UG0y-rAEs
I also made a longer stem, by adding more chains, just so I could attach it to the roses better.

Crochet Rose Leaf Crochet Rose Leaf

Thanks for viewing and thank you again to my new visitors and subscribers!

-Kati-


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The Return of the Crochet Rose

Hi!

I’m such a bad crafts blogger! I was supposed to blog more this year, but empty excuses and laziness got in my way. Apologies!

I will try my best to post something new this summer. But for now… here are two crochet roses I’ve made recently.

Have a great summer!

A pink crochet rose A red crochet rose

Kusudama

Introducing another flowery project, but, for a change, the next project is from the time-consuming and paper-cut-ridden field of origami!

I was browsing through Craftster.org, in the look-out for inspiration, when I came across this Japanese origami flower called Kusudama. If you’re interested in knowing how the paper flower ball is made, follow the links in the Craftster.org post (the instructions/tutorial is originally by Foldingtrees.com).

My Kusudama ball is made from pages from a phonebook (recycling!), and due to the lack of glue, I was forced to use dry adhesive (double-sided tape), which caused me some assembly problems, but all in all, it turned out pretty great. A single flower is made from 5 slips of paper (7cm x 7cm OR 3″ x 3″), and the entire Kusudama ball has 12 flowers in it. And so… 60 paper slips, 12 flowers, and 3-4 hours later… here’s my Kusudama ball! Thanks for viewing!